Mission

To provide support and services to the social work regulatory community to advance safe, competent, and ethical practices to strengthen public protection.

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Member boards have a role in achieving the strategic framework—ASWB staff are ready to assist

Exemptions allow social work practice to occur without requiring the practitioner to be licensed.  Generally, exemptions are based on practice setting. During early legislative wrangling to get licensing laws on the books, exemptions were often viewed as a politically necessary evil; they helped push laws through, easing the objections of legislators or lowering other barriers. The good news is that today, clinical social workers are licensed in all U.S. states and territories. Master’s social workers are licensed in 49 U.S. jurisdictions, and baccalaureate social workers are licensed in 43 U.S. jurisdictions. In Canada, all ten provinces register social workers. The bad news is that there are exemptions throughout much of U.S. and Canadian social work regulation. ASWB’s vision in the 2019–2021 Strategic Framework is: “All social workers are licensed in order to protect clients and client systems.” When ASWB staff and the Board of Directors were collaborating on the vision and goals for the strategic framework last year, they were intentional about creating a vision that was challenging, focused on the shared mission of public protection, and forward facing on a ten-year trajectory rather than the three-year focus of the strategic goals and objectives. So one of the first steps in achieving ASWB’s vision was developing the strategic goal to “Advance knowledge and acceptance of social work as a licensed profession” and setting as the first objective “Decrease the number of licensure exemptions in social work regulation.” As CEO Mary Jo Monahan explained when the goals were introduced, “As long as exemptions remain in regulatory laws and rules, we are not licensing all social workers, and we truly are not ‘protecting the public’ from harm.”  

Tools to assist members eliminate exemptions

In total, 165 instances of professional exemptions were identified in 40 states. The greatest frequency of exemptions is for employees in local, state, and federal government positions. There is good news, however, regarding states that do not have exemptions: Professional exemptions could not be found in 14 states, according to the latest information gathered by Cara Sanner, ASWB regulatory support services coordinator. “Social work is one of a very few professions that have licensure exemptions,” said Jennifer Henkel, ASWB senior manager of member services and strategic initiatives. “In support of the strategic framework objective to decrease the number of exemptions, we have a number of tools available to members.” The primary tool in the tool kit to eliminate exemptions is the Model Social Work Practice Act. The model act does not allow any exemptions to licensure of baccalaureate, master’s, or clinical social workers. As explained in the notes on Article I, sections 104, 105, and 106, “As stated in the Introduction to the Act, ‘A model social work practice act must be concerned with the protection of the public first and foremost.’ If social workers’ practice is beyond the purview of legal regulation through licensing, the public will have less recourse to protection from or remedies for incompetent or harmful practice.” Other tools include information sheets that provide rationales and talking points on the benefits of professional regulation, licensure by endorsement, and the importance of eliminating exemptions. These information sheets are available for downloading from members.aswb.org. “We encourage members to use the talking points when meeting with legislators,” said Jayne Wood, ASWB director of communications and marketing. “The sheets are designed with short, bulleted statements that are intended to be easy to share when in conversation. The sheets can also be printed and left with a legislator.” Another way to use the information sheets is to share them with the local NASW chapter to support members’ advocacy efforts with legislators. Consistent messaging will strengthen the dialogue with lawmakers. ASWB’s admin list serve is another resource that member board staff can use to share strategies for dealing with issues of common concern. Sanner, who facilitates the list serve, provides data and research in response to members’ questions. The research paper “U.S. social work regulations and licensure exemptions” was updated in July. Henkel and the executive team of Chief Operating Officer Dwight Hymans and CEO Mary Jo Monahan are available for board consultations to strategize about ways to make changes to laws for eliminating licensure exemptions as well as for other topics.

Path to Licensure raising awareness with educators

In the social work education arena, ASWB is addressing this issue through the Path to Licensure program. The “Get Licensed, Live Licensed” tagline of this program resonates with students, and more and more educators are modeling licensure for their students as laws change. Jan Fitts, ASWB education and research senior manager, runs the Path to Licensure program. She is working with member boards to facilitate meetings with local schools of social work to help spread the word about regulation and getting licensed. This fall, she will be on a “Midwest tour” that includes stops in West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan. ASWB sponsored and collaborated with the Council on Social Work Education and the NASW Risk Retention Group to develop the Curricular Guide for Licensing and Regulation, published in 2018 by CSWE. The curricular guide is organized around the nine competencies that social work programs must address to remain accredited, and it highlights licensing and regulation content for use with generalist or specialized practice curricula. The guide provides resources for baccalaureate and master’s programs and courses.

Eliminating exemptions requires member board support

ASWB’s vision of “all social workers are licensed” is challenging but achievable. Before this “Big Hairy Audacious Vision” can be accomplished, however, jurisdictions will need to work on eliminating licensure exemptions. In this issue’s Counsel’s Column, Dale Atkinson provides additional food for thought." ["post_title"]=> string(82) "Exemptions. Can’t live with ’em…how can we change law to live without ’em?" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(68) "exemptions-cant-live-with-emhow-can-we-change-law-to-live-without-em" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-08-30 08:17:54" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-08-30 12:17:54" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(63) "https://www.aswb.org/?post_type=aswb_announcements&p=78936" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(18) "aswb_announcements" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#2224 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(78611) ["post_author"]=> string(4) "4024" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-08-30 08:08:23" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-08-30 12:08:23" ["post_content"]=> string(5942) "ASWB’s Exam Committee is the largest committee in the association. At multiple in-person meetings each year, committee members review dozens of exam questions to approve their use as unscored items on the licensing exams. But Exam Committee members aren’t the only volunteers pondering important questions. Five other ASWB committees met in Alexandria, Virginia, in July to consider issues facing the association. Their charges, delivered to each committee by the ASWB Board of Directors, are, in essence, questions that committee members need to work on together to answer.
  • Who should be on the election slate?
  • How can the Public Protection Database be more effective?
  • When should a sanctioned social worker be allowed to practice again?
  • How can ASWB bring researchers and regulators together?
  • What happens if a member of the Nominating Committee can’t complete a term?
All told, more than 30 volunteers and eight ASWB staff members attended committee in-person meetings this summer, addressing these questions and more. The tasks that the Bylaws and Resolutions Committee tackled in July included reviewing options for filling vacancies on the Nominating Committee, revisiting a question from 2018 about members voting on exam issues, and evaluating membership contracts. Its conclusions will be reflected in recommendations made to the Delegate Assembly at the 2019 Annual Meeting in November. [caption id="attachment_78756" align="aligncenter" width="604"] The Bylaws and Resolutions Committee (front row from left): Heidi Nieuwsma (ND), chair Kathy Outland (OR), Greg Winkler (WI); (back row from left): Lise Betteridge (ON), Robert Showers (LA), and Board liaison Ken Middlebrooks (MN). Not pictured: Jim Campbell (BC).[/caption]   The Regulation and Standards Committee handled a list of ongoing charges that includes monitoring the Public Protection Database, reviewing the Model Social Work Practice Act, and identifying emerging issues in social work regulation. The committee also took on additional charges concerning support of ASWB’s ongoing practice mobility efforts, regulatory reform, and other topics. [caption id="attachment_78752" align="aligncenter" width="604"] The Regulation and Standards Committee (from left): Mavis Azariah-Armattoe (DC), John Shalett (LA), Cheney Cloke (BC), Jeffrey Trant (MA), Board liaison Beatrice Traub-Werner (ON), Jaime Hoyle (VA), and committee chair Thomas Brooks (MN).[/caption] The Continuing Competence Committee took on a special charge from the Board of Directors that focused on reentry to practice. During its two-day meeting, committee members developed recommendations for how social work boards should approach the issue of social workers who have been removed from practice. [caption id="attachment_78755" align="aligncenter" width="604"] The Continuing Competence Committee (from left): Chair Elizabeth Pope (NC), Shelley Hale (ON), Danielle LaFon (AK), Walter Orellana (RI), Kenya Anderson (TN), and Board liaison Lisa Crockwell (NL).[/caption] Members of the Regulatory Education and Leadership Committee spent two days continuing their planning for the 2020 Education Conference. Tasked with putting together a conference that will highlight the importance of research in professional regulation, the REAL Committee nailed down session topics and brainstormed ways to make the conference engaging for attendees. [caption id="attachment_78754" align="aligncenter" width="604"] The Regulatory Education and Leadership Committee (from left): Board liaison Deborah Jones (BC), Richard Gregory (AB), Erin Michel (OH), Cedric “Doc” Davis (AZ), Carol Payne (MN), and chair Denise Capaci (MD). Not pictured: Stephan Viehweg (IN).[/caption] The Nominating Committee met in person this July, which is a departure from previous years. With an early July deadline for recommendations, the committee spent its time together reviewing the qualifications and experience of potential candidates. The Nominating Committee will present the complete election slate to the membership in October. [caption id="attachment_78753" align="aligncenter" width="604"] The Nominating Committee (from left): Ann-Marie Buchanan (TN), Ginny Dickman (ID), Claude Savoie (NB), Glenda Webber (NL), and chair Carla Moore (LA).[/caption]" ["post_title"]=> string(74) "Some of ASWB’s most important questions come before committee volunteers" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(71) "some-of-aswbs-most-important-questions-come-before-committee-volunteers" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-08-30 08:18:23" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-08-30 12:18:23" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(63) "https://www.aswb.org/?post_type=aswb_announcements&p=78611" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(18) "aswb_announcements" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#2164 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(78863) ["post_author"]=> string(4) "4024" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-08-30 08:07:57" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-08-30 12:07:57" ["post_content"]=> string(3413) "Recognizing volunteers for leadership and commitment is part of the Volunteer Engagement and Outreach department’s role in serving ASWB membership. In 2018, the department conceived of the Contributor Award in response to executive management’s desire to recognize individuals who have contributed to the work of ASWB who are not ASWB members. “The Contributor Award recognizes individuals in the social work community for their efforts to promote regulation and public protection,” said ASWB CEO Mary Jo Monahan. “The award is an important support to the strategic framework goals of regulatory research and advancing acceptance of social work as a licensed profession.” Frederic G. Reamer, Ph.D., is the inaugural recipient of the Contributor Award, which will be presented at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Delegate Assembly in Orlando. Reamer was chosen because of his long-standing partnership with ASWB and his leadership in the study of professional ethics. Reamer keynoted the 2012 ASWB Education Meeting on the topics of social media and electronic communication in social work practice, introducing social work regulators to the ethical, practice-based, and regulatory challenges posed by technology. He later provided the keynote at the 2015 Education Conference on social work practice mobility, explaining technology’s influence. His study of the ethics of technology in social work informed development of ASWB’s Model Regulatory Standards for Technology and Social Work Practice, and he chaired the 2013–2014 ASWB International Technology Task Force that developed the standards. He also chaired the task force collaborative of representatives from ASWB, NASW, the Council on Social Work Education, and the Clinical Social Work Association that developed the NASW, ASWB, CSWE, & CSWA Standards for Technology in Social Work Practice, published by NASW in 2017. "I am deeply touched by ASWB's acknowledgment of my contributions to the complex world of social work regulation,” Reamer said. “One of the great privileges of my career has been the opportunity to collaborate with ASWB over many years in our collective effort to strengthen our profession. I consider my relationships with Mary Jo Monahan, Dwight Hymans, and Donna DeAngelis [former ASWB executive director], among others at ASWB, to be among the richest of my career." Reamer is a professor in the graduate program of the Rhode Island College School of Social Work, where he has been a member of faculty since 1983. His research and teaching have addressed a wide range of human services issues, including mental health, health care, criminal justice, public welfare, and professional ethics. Reamer received his doctorate from the University of Chicago and has served as a social worker in correctional and mental health settings. He is the author of many books and articles on professional ethics and criminal justice. “We need more leaders in the social work community like Frederic Reamer to advance the public protection mission of ASWB’s membership,” said Monahan. “This award helps raise awareness of the ways that ASWB is collaborating with other ‘pillars of the profession’ to promote social work regulation to social  work students, practitioners, and the public.” Reamer will present a keynote address to membership on Friday, November 8, at the annual meeting." 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Member boards have a role in achieving the strategic framework—ASWB staff are ready to assist

Exemptions allow social work practice to occur without requiring the practitioner to be licensed.  Generally, exemptions are based on practice setting. During early legislative wrangling to get licensing laws on the books, exemptions were often viewed as a politically necessary evil; they helped push laws through, easing the objections of legislators or lowering other barriers. The good news is that today, clinical social workers are licensed in all U.S. states and territories. Master’s social workers are licensed in 49 U.S. jurisdictions, and baccalaureate social workers are licensed in 43 U.S. jurisdictions. In Canada, all ten provinces register social workers. The bad news is that there are exemptions throughout much of U.S. and Canadian social work regulation. ASWB’s vision in the 2019–2021 Strategic Framework is: “All social workers are licensed in order to protect clients and client systems.” When ASWB staff and the Board of Directors were collaborating on the vision and goals for the strategic framework last year, they were intentional about creating a vision that was challenging, focused on the shared mission of public protection, and forward facing on a ten-year trajectory rather than the three-year focus of the strategic goals and objectives. So one of the first steps in achieving ASWB’s vision was developing the strategic goal to “Advance knowledge and acceptance of social work as a licensed profession” and setting as the first objective “Decrease the number of licensure exemptions in social work regulation.” As CEO Mary Jo Monahan explained when the goals were introduced, “As long as exemptions remain in regulatory laws and rules, we are not licensing all social workers, and we truly are not ‘protecting the public’ from harm.”  

Tools to assist members eliminate exemptions

In total, 165 instances of professional exemptions were identified in 40 states. The greatest frequency of exemptions is for employees in local, state, and federal government positions. There is good news, however, regarding states that do not have exemptions: Professional exemptions could not be found in 14 states, according to the latest information gathered by Cara Sanner, ASWB regulatory support services coordinator. “Social work is one of a very few professions that have licensure exemptions,” said Jennifer Henkel, ASWB senior manager of member services and strategic initiatives. “In support of the strategic framework objective to decrease the number of exemptions, we have a number of tools available to members.” The primary tool in the tool kit to eliminate exemptions is the Model Social Work Practice Act. The model act does not allow any exemptions to licensure of baccalaureate, master’s, or clinical social workers. As explained in the notes on Article I, sections 104, 105, and 106, “As stated in the Introduction to the Act, ‘A model social work practice act must be concerned with the protection of the public first and foremost.’ If social workers’ practice is beyond the purview of legal regulation through licensing, the public will have less recourse to protection from or remedies for incompetent or harmful practice.” Other tools include information sheets that provide rationales and talking points on the benefits of professional regulation, licensure by endorsement, and the importance of eliminating exemptions. These information sheets are available for downloading from members.aswb.org. “We encourage members to use the talking points when meeting with legislators,” said Jayne Wood, ASWB director of communications and marketing. “The sheets are designed with short, bulleted statements that are intended to be easy to share when in conversation. The sheets can also be printed and left with a legislator.” Another way to use the information sheets is to share them with the local NASW chapter to support members’ advocacy efforts with legislators. Consistent messaging will strengthen the dialogue with lawmakers. ASWB’s admin list serve is another resource that member board staff can use to share strategies for dealing with issues of common concern. Sanner, who facilitates the list serve, provides data and research in response to members’ questions. The research paper “U.S. social work regulations and licensure exemptions” was updated in July. Henkel and the executive team of Chief Operating Officer Dwight Hymans and CEO Mary Jo Monahan are available for board consultations to strategize about ways to make changes to laws for eliminating licensure exemptions as well as for other topics.

Path to Licensure raising awareness with educators

In the social work education arena, ASWB is addressing this issue through the Path to Licensure program. The “Get Licensed, Live Licensed” tagline of this program resonates with students, and more and more educators are modeling licensure for their students as laws change. Jan Fitts, ASWB education and research senior manager, runs the Path to Licensure program. She is working with member boards to facilitate meetings with local schools of social work to help spread the word about regulation and getting licensed. This fall, she will be on a “Midwest tour” that includes stops in West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan. ASWB sponsored and collaborated with the Council on Social Work Education and the NASW Risk Retention Group to develop the Curricular Guide for Licensing and Regulation, published in 2018 by CSWE. The curricular guide is organized around the nine competencies that social work programs must address to remain accredited, and it highlights licensing and regulation content for use with generalist or specialized practice curricula. The guide provides resources for baccalaureate and master’s programs and courses.

Eliminating exemptions requires member board support

ASWB’s vision of “all social workers are licensed” is challenging but achievable. Before this “Big Hairy Audacious Vision” can be accomplished, however, jurisdictions will need to work on eliminating licensure exemptions. In this issue’s Counsel’s Column, Dale Atkinson provides additional food for thought." ["post_title"]=> string(82) "Exemptions. Can’t live with ’em…how can we change law to live without ’em?" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(68) "exemptions-cant-live-with-emhow-can-we-change-law-to-live-without-em" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-08-30 08:17:54" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-08-30 12:17:54" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(63) "https://www.aswb.org/?post_type=aswb_announcements&p=78936" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(18) "aswb_announcements" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } ["comment_count"]=> int(0) ["current_comment"]=> int(-1) ["found_posts"]=> string(3) "102" ["max_num_pages"]=> float(34) ["max_num_comment_pages"]=> int(0) ["is_single"]=> bool(false) ["is_preview"]=> bool(false) ["is_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_archive"]=> bool(true) ["is_date"]=> bool(false) ["is_year"]=> bool(false) ["is_month"]=> bool(false) ["is_day"]=> bool(false) ["is_time"]=> bool(false) ["is_author"]=> bool(false) ["is_category"]=> bool(false) ["is_tag"]=> bool(false) ["is_tax"]=> bool(false) ["is_search"]=> bool(false) ["is_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_comment_feed"]=> bool(false) ["is_trackback"]=> bool(false) ["is_home"]=> bool(false) ["is_404"]=> bool(false) ["is_embed"]=> bool(false) ["is_paged"]=> bool(false) ["is_admin"]=> bool(false) ["is_attachment"]=> bool(false) ["is_singular"]=> bool(false) ["is_robots"]=> bool(false) ["is_posts_page"]=> bool(false) ["is_post_type_archive"]=> bool(true) ["query_vars_hash":"WP_Query":private]=> string(32) "4078ab6eb58e193d87ed8c37e7e1447c" ["query_vars_changed":"WP_Query":private]=> bool(false) ["thumbnails_cached"]=> bool(false) ["stopwords":"WP_Query":private]=> NULL ["compat_fields":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(15) "query_vars_hash" [1]=> string(18) "query_vars_changed" } ["compat_methods":"WP_Query":private]=> array(2) { [0]=> string(16) "init_query_flags" [1]=> string(15) "parse_tax_query" } }

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