Mission

To provide support and services to the social work regulatory community to advance safe, competent, and ethical practices to strengthen public protection.

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Embracing Regulatory Research, the 2020 education meeting, will be held April 23–25 in Chicago. Look for registration information in late January!
Like a Classical Greek labyrinth, research is full of intricate passageways and blind alleys. Venturing into this maze will reveal ideas that lead to tantalizing places and ideas that lead to anticipated outcomes that support regulatory best practices. Threading the regulatory research maze began at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Delegate Assembly. Jennifer Henkel, senior director of member services and strategic initiatives, and Jan Fitts, education and research senior manager, held focus groups at the Administrators Forum, the Board Member Exchange, and the Board of Directors meeting to ask attendees to help identify research topics that they thought would be most useful in helping them make board decisions. Focus group participants were asked to go broad—selecting all topics that looked interesting—and deep, prioritizing three areas. Henkel and Fitts invited participants to add topics that were not included. Henkel explained that she and Fitts, with help from Cara Sanner, regulatory support services coordinator, produced the list during a brainstorming session. Icon of a head in profile with gears turningHenkel also asked participants what types of research they had relied on in the past when making board decisions. In the Board of Directors focus group, a few Board members mentioned gathering research related to licensing fees, complaints from consumers, types of violations and sanctions, and license eligibility when an applicant has a criminal history. In the Board Member Exchange focus group, participants also sought research about disciplinary sanctions, criminal history and license eligibility, and licensing fees. They shared other examples, such as research around supervision hours in Kentucky, public awareness about the importance of licensure for public protection in New Brunswick, and electronic practice in Oregon. In the Administrators Forum, Kim Madsen of California shared that she gathered research on licensing laws across the United States when the board was developing its license portability legislation. Ruthie Bain said that research helped the Arkansas board make decisions related to licensing fees. Lucy Richards, administrator of the Montana board, brought up the need for research into license titles, which led to a discussion of expanding the research into other behavioral health professions for those administrators managing composite boards. “The focus groups were narrative exercises that yielded qualitative data,” said Henkel. “Early in December we sent out a survey to capture quantitative data.” Staff will compile the results to share with the Board of Directors at its January meeting. At that time, the Board will sift through them to come up with the list of research priorities that will be presented to membership at the 2020 education meeting, Embracing Regulatory Research. For those whose eyes glaze over when the conversation turns to research, Henkel offers an interesting anecdote. She learned about a doctoral dissertation that examined the factors influencing people in their decision to become licensed. The study found that the only barrier to becoming licensed was the fee. The researcher got a grant to pay the licensing fees for the research group, and everyone who met the eligibility criteria got licensed. Research can inform—sometimes with unanticipated outcomes. Research can also substantiate—as several members have reported. Backing regulatory decisions with research has offered them legitimacy when providing testimony to policy makers and helped legislators accept the information because it was based on facts. Embracing Regulatory Research, the 2020 education meeting, will be held April 23–25 in Chicago. Look for registration information in late January!" ["post_title"]=> string(38) "Threading the regulatory research maze" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(38) "threading-the-regulatory-research-maze" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-12-19 09:23:41" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-19 13:23:41" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(63) "https://www.aswb.org/?post_type=aswb_announcements&p=83070" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(18) "aswb_announcements" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#1823 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(83071) ["post_author"]=> string(4) "4024" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-19 09:22:55" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-19 13:22:55" ["post_content"]=> string(6586) " 
“The big picture was the public protection that is provided by having an exam in place. That was a motivator.” Elizabeth Pope, Executive Director North Carolina Social Work Certification and Licensure Board
  For the North Carolina Social Work Certification and Licensure Board, a process that began three and a half years ago—when ASWB let its members know that they would have until June 2021 to come into compliance with its exam use policy—ended in November. Governor Roy Cooper signed SB 537, legislation that amends the state’s social work practice act to require clinical social workers to take the Clinical examination after two years of supervised practice, rather than within two years of being issued North Carolina’s Licensed Clinical Social Worker Associate license. Typically, this license is issued to social workers with an MSW who are in the process of acquiring experience and supervision hours toward earning their Clinical license. The law goes into effect January 2021. According to ASWB Policy 2.1, “The Clinical exam has been developed for use as a licensure requirement by member boards that issue to individuals who have an MSW and two years (or commensurate experience as defined by the jurisdiction) of experience in clinical settings, licenses for the practice of Clinical Social Work.” Allowing licensure candidates to take the exam before that time can erode the exam’s reliability, and consequently its validity. Part of the process of ensuring validity includes maintaining high psychometric standards by gathering statistics on item (test question) performance. If the data collected is to be an accurate measurement of an exam’s performance, it’s critical that only test-takers with the intended education and experience take an exam. [caption id="attachment_83072" align="alignleft" width="595"] Rep. Sydney Batch, center, tweeted about the passage of a law amending North Carolina’s social work practice act. She is shown with, left to right, Rep. Graig R. Meyer; Kay Castillo, director of advocacy, policy, and legislation at NASW-NC; Rep. MaryAnn Black; and Valerie Arendt, executive director of NASW-NC.[/caption] As soon as ASWB set the exam compliance deadline, the North Carolina board began to review its practice act. “The board established an ad hoc committee to review the statute and the ASWB model law before proposing language to the entire board,” said Elizabeth Pope, the board’s executive director. During the next two years, stakeholder meetings were held, and the NASW-North Carolina chapter became involved to advocate for the amendment with the North Carolina General Assembly. During this process, ASWB provided the North Carolina board and stakeholders with background information about exam requirements in other jurisdictions as the jurisdiction considered ways to enhance practice mobility. Cara Sanner, ASWB regulatory support services coordinator, provided needed data, and Dwight Hymans, ASWB chief operating officer, attended a stakeholder meeting in 2018 to talk about ASWB exam validity and answer questions about the exam use policy. By early 2019, “I was spending several days a week in Raleigh,” Pope said. She had only just become the board’s executive director in January. “I learned a lot about how an idea becomes a law. It was enlightening; I was surprised at how political the process was.” Representatives Sydney Batch, Graig Meyer, and MaryAnn Black of the North Carolina General Assembly signed on as three of the bill’s primary sponsors. All three have degrees in social work. The board’s legal counsel was also involved throughout the process. The lawyer’s guidance and expertise proved critical, Pope said, especially because the bill’s path was not straight. The original bill did not pass through its committee hearing, “which resulted in the board regrouping and strategizing new avenues for getting the bill to pass,” Pope said. In April 2019, the bill was joined with bills concerning substance abuse counselors and licensed professional counselors. The combined bill passed the rules committee in May. It passed in the House with no opposition in August, passed in the Senate in October, and was signed in November. An additional provision of the new law is to limit to six years the time allowed for an individual licensed as an Associate to pass the Clinical exam and acquire clinical practice experience. Once the licensee has held the LCSWA for six years without passing the exam, the individual forfeits all supervision and experience hours accrued and must pass the Masters exam before beginning again to accumulate hours needed for the LCSW, the license required to practice clinical social work independently. “This was a long, drawn-out journey,” said Pope, “requiring the cooperation of many people with different agendas.” She advises other boards involved in similar pursuits to be prepared to be flexible. “While we didn’t land exactly where we would have liked to, I feel we did an excellent job at meeting the needs of all parties involved.” Despite the need for flexibility and the complex process required to get the new law in place, Pope feels that public protection remained at the forefront as the board sought to come into compliance with the exam use policy. “The big picture was the public protection that is provided by having an exam in place,” she said. “That was a motivator.” Hymans, who serves as the ASWB point of contact for the review process, says that of the 23 jurisdictions that were out of compliance when the 2021 deadline was announced, only nine remain in that status. Most of the nine jurisdictions are working with ASWB to make the needed changes that will bring them into compliance with the exam use policy by the deadline.  Some boards have made or will work to make changes to laws and regulations like North Carolina’s board did. Others are best served by requesting an exception to ASWB’s exam use policy. Hymans reminds member boards that ASWB is available to assist them: “We are always willing to talk to your board members and board staff to answer questions or concerns about compliance with exam policy.”  " ["post_title"]=> string(74) "North Carolina amendment brings state into compliance with exam use policy" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(74) "north-carolina-amendment-brings-state-into-compliance-with-exam-use-policy" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-12-19 09:23:23" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-19 13:23:23" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(63) "https://www.aswb.org/?post_type=aswb_announcements&p=83071" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(18) "aswb_announcements" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#2178 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(82941) ["post_author"]=> string(4) "4024" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-19 09:20:12" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-19 13:20:12" ["post_content"]=> string(6227) "ASWB presented awards to three long-term contributors to the regulation of social work at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Delegate Assembly.

Contributor Award

The Contributor Award—given this year for the first time—went to Frederic G. Reamer, Ph.D. “What a career!” ASWB President Tim Brown said upon presenting Reamer with the award. A professor in the graduate program of the Rhode Island College School of Social Work since 1983, Reamer has had, according to Brown, “…an exceptional impact on the social work profession.” Brown catalogued Reamer’s many contributions, ranging from helping to revise the 1996 edition of the NASW Code of Ethics to working with ASWB to develop model regulatory standards for technology and social work practice to leading the effort to develop and later revise technology standards used by social work practitioners. He has taught, written, and spoken on competent, ethical practice for more than 30 years. Beyond his academic contributions, Brown said, Reamer also displays admirable personal characteristics. “… Dr. Reamer interacts from a place of unselfish kindness, generosity of spirit, and big heartedness,” Brown said. “Today, we recognize Dr. Reamer for his selflessness and service on the many volunteer leadership projects he's been involved in.” In accepting the award, Reamer offered the keynote address, reflecting on the history of social work ethics and the challenges presented by technology. He outlined major eras in social work ethics understanding, putting the current era into context. As those concerned with social work ethics meet the challenges of today’s “digital period,” he said that we are experiencing a time of uncertainty about the ethical ramifications of electronic practice. He acknowledged both the positive and negative aspects of service provision through, for example, the use of avatars in a virtual group therapy session. “I think it's complicated, with arguments for and against,” he said. “It’s what we call ambidextrous ethics.” The term, he explained, refers to the need to balance the advantage of increasing access to mental health care with the challenge of dealing with informed consent, confidentiality, and boundaries. “And I think that's where we are in our profession,” Reamer said. “We’re trying to figure out the difference between being there in person for our clients and using [technological devices] and the implications for regulation.”

Glenda McDonald Award

The 2019 Glenda McDonald Board Administrator Award for Outstanding Commitment to Social Work Regulatory Board Service was presented to Emily DeAngelo, administrator of the Louisiana State Board of Social Work Examiners. DeAngelo has been the administrator of the Louisiana board for 11 years and employed by the board for more than 20 years. She first won this award in 2005. [caption id="attachment_82961" align="alignleft" width="600"] Emily DeAngelo (LA) received the Glenda McDonald award from John Shalett, chair of the Louisiana Board of Social Work Examiners.[/caption] Presenting the award, Louisiana’s board chair, John Shalett, said, “Emily typifies willpower, resolve, fortitude, tenacity, determination to achieve, courage and yes, positive stubbornness.” He shared that the members of the board who nominated DeAngelo highlighted her commitment to activities “that serve to protect the public and inform behavioral professions on the importance of regulation through education and outreach.” She coordinates visits by board members to schools of social work and social work agencies and serves as a regular speaker at Louisiana NASW chapter events. “She exemplifies what it means to be a true ambassador for the board.” In accepting the award, DeAngelo spoke of the mentors who helped her achieve excellence and her passion for public protection. “And while I may be a very quiet person, … my quietness is never meant to be disinterest because I have so much interest in the protection of the public.”

Sunny Andrews Award

Robert Payne of Idaho received the 2019 Sunny Andrews Award for Outstanding Commitment to Social Work Regulatory Board Service. Payne served as a member of the Idaho Board of Social Work Examiners for 20 years, recently finishing his final term. [caption id="attachment_82962" align="alignleft" width="600"] Robert Payne (ID) received the Sunny Andrews award from Donna Hatch, chair of the Idaho Board of Social Work Examiners.[/caption]   Donna Hatch, chair of the Idaho Board of Social Work Examiners, presented the award, accompanied at the podium by board member Ginny Dickman. “Over the years,” Hatch said, “[Payne] has worked diligently to align our statutes closely with the ASWB model law. He has testified before numerous House and Senate committees to explain proposed law and rule changes, and he has served on various committees, steadfastly working with our board to be proactive and progressive.” Dickman agreed that Payne’s leadership has been an asset to her home state. “He has been able to take ASWB recommendations and move them forward,” she said, “and we've gotten so many of the recommendations approved and adopted.” Accepting the award, Payne said it reflects the efforts of many to make positive change. “This will not go in a drawer,” he promised. “It'll be proudly displayed. …This really belongs to all of us.” The Sunny Andrews and Glenda McDonald awards are given annually and are named after social work regulators who exemplified the attributes and character of outstanding board members and staff through their service to their individual jurisdictional boards." ["post_title"]=> string(21) "Decades of excellence" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(21) "decades-of-excellence" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2019-12-19 09:21:35" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-19 13:21:35" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(63) "https://www.aswb.org/?post_type=aswb_announcements&p=82941" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(18) "aswb_announcements" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(3) ["current_post"]=> int(-1) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(false) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#1825 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(83070) ["post_author"]=> string(4) "4024" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2019-12-19 09:23:25" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2019-12-19 13:23:25" ["post_content"]=> string(4215) " 
Embracing Regulatory Research, the 2020 education meeting, will be held April 23–25 in Chicago. Look for registration information in late January!
Like a Classical Greek labyrinth, research is full of intricate passageways and blind alleys. Venturing into this maze will reveal ideas that lead to tantalizing places and ideas that lead to anticipated outcomes that support regulatory best practices. Threading the regulatory research maze began at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Delegate Assembly. Jennifer Henkel, senior director of member services and strategic initiatives, and Jan Fitts, education and research senior manager, held focus groups at the Administrators Forum, the Board Member Exchange, and the Board of Directors meeting to ask attendees to help identify research topics that they thought would be most useful in helping them make board decisions. Focus group participants were asked to go broad—selecting all topics that looked interesting—and deep, prioritizing three areas. Henkel and Fitts invited participants to add topics that were not included. Henkel explained that she and Fitts, with help from Cara Sanner, regulatory support services coordinator, produced the list during a brainstorming session. Icon of a head in profile with gears turningHenkel also asked participants what types of research they had relied on in the past when making board decisions. In the Board of Directors focus group, a few Board members mentioned gathering research related to licensing fees, complaints from consumers, types of violations and sanctions, and license eligibility when an applicant has a criminal history. In the Board Member Exchange focus group, participants also sought research about disciplinary sanctions, criminal history and license eligibility, and licensing fees. They shared other examples, such as research around supervision hours in Kentucky, public awareness about the importance of licensure for public protection in New Brunswick, and electronic practice in Oregon. In the Administrators Forum, Kim Madsen of California shared that she gathered research on licensing laws across the United States when the board was developing its license portability legislation. Ruthie Bain said that research helped the Arkansas board make decisions related to licensing fees. Lucy Richards, administrator of the Montana board, brought up the need for research into license titles, which led to a discussion of expanding the research into other behavioral health professions for those administrators managing composite boards. “The focus groups were narrative exercises that yielded qualitative data,” said Henkel. “Early in December we sent out a survey to capture quantitative data.” Staff will compile the results to share with the Board of Directors at its January meeting. At that time, the Board will sift through them to come up with the list of research priorities that will be presented to membership at the 2020 education meeting, Embracing Regulatory Research. For those whose eyes glaze over when the conversation turns to research, Henkel offers an interesting anecdote. She learned about a doctoral dissertation that examined the factors influencing people in their decision to become licensed. The study found that the only barrier to becoming licensed was the fee. The researcher got a grant to pay the licensing fees for the research group, and everyone who met the eligibility criteria got licensed. Research can inform—sometimes with unanticipated outcomes. Research can also substantiate—as several members have reported. Backing regulatory decisions with research has offered them legitimacy when providing testimony to policy makers and helped legislators accept the information because it was based on facts. Embracing Regulatory Research, the 2020 education meeting, will be held April 23–25 in Chicago. Look for registration information in late January!" 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