Mission

To provide support and services to the social work regulatory community to advance safe, competent, and ethical practices to strengthen public protection.

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President's Message
[caption id="attachment_81440" align="alignleft" width="200"] Harold Dean, ASWB president[/caption] During my career I have observed the process of leadership change in several different organizations. Some of these changes have been handled well; others have not. A change in leadership can be challenging for both an agency’s employees as well as its clients. This is especially true if the new leader does not have a full understanding of the day-to-day operations and how departments work together to achieve the overall mission. In these types of situations, employees often become dissatisfied in their work, and as a result client or member services can suffer. These are just a few of the reasons the selection process for leadership of any organization must be thoughtful, deliberate, and strategic. This was certainly the case when the ASWB Board of Directors made the thoughtful, deliberate, and strategic decision to select Dwight as our organization’s next CEO. As Dwight moves into the role of CEO, he brings with him an extensive knowledge of the ASWB organization. Dwight has been a valuable employee of ASWB for the last 13 years. He formerly served as manager and then director of board services, where he gained an understanding of regulatory issues as well as the similarities and differences of our member boards. For the last four years, he has served in the role of COO, gaining firsthand knowledge of the day-to-day business operations of the ASWB organization. During his time at ASWB, he has routinely represented the association in meetings throughout the United States and Canada, all the while establishing excellent working relationships with other stakeholder organizations. Dwight has also been involved with our current strategic framework at every phase of the process from proposal by the Board, to adoption by the delegate assembly, to our current implementation efforts. And of course, anyone who has attended delegate assembly in the last few years knows that Dwight has been at the helm of the construction of our new ASWB headquarters. Because of his dedicated service in various leadership roles, Dwight has gained the trust and respect of our member boards. Given all these factors, the Board of Directors is confident that Dwight’s professionalism, prior experience, institutional knowledge of ASWB, and understanding of the broader issues of possible impact to the organization will ensure that our organization remains relevant, financially stable, and committed to excellence. With a background in health care, I usually associate the number 2020 with the measurement of a person’s visual acuity. During the year 2020, it is important that ASWB use one of the skills of visual acuity—focus. 2020 will bring with it not only a transition in ASWB’s CEO leadership but also the transition of moving to our new headquarters where all of ASWB’s operations will finally be under one roof. This will be an exciting time for our staff, Board of Directors, and member boards. Throughout these changes, our organization must remain true to its mission “to provide support and services to the social work regulatory community to advance safe, competent, and ethical practices to strengthen public protection.” ASWB is a wonderful organization, not only because of its highly skilled staff, but also because of the many wonderful, committed volunteers who support the work of the association. As we continue to move forward in 2020, it is my sincere hope that in whatever capacity you may serve our organization, you will join me in using 20/20 vision to keep a sharp and clear focus on ASWB’s commitment to public protection." ["post_title"]=> string(47) "20/20 in 2020: Focusing on a year of transition" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(45) "2020-in-2020-focusing-on-a-year-of-transition" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-02-28 14:47:07" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-02-28 18:47:07" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(63) "https://www.aswb.org/?post_type=aswb_announcements&p=85990" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(18) "aswb_announcements" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [1]=> object(WP_Post)#1823 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(85993) ["post_author"]=> string(4) "4024" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-02-28 12:20:35" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-02-28 16:20:35" ["post_content"]=> string(9230) " 
[caption id="attachment_85991" align="alignleft" width="200"] ASWB incoming CEO Dwight Hymans[/caption] “Whatever you are, be a good one.”—Abraham Lincoln
Dwight Hymans, ASWB chief operating officer, shared Lincoln’s quote during his remarks following ASWB President Harold Dean’s announcement to staff that the Board of Directors had selected Hymans as incoming CEO. Hymans used the opportunity to offer thoughts about leadership and teamwork to the rest of the staff and to the Board. His pledges to staff included that he plans to continue the values and culture that Mary Jo and he worked to create over the last eight years, he will support staff in their roles, and he will continue to collaborate with all staff to ensure that ASWB stays mission-focused. He concluded the remarks with a quote from Margaret Mead, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, concerned citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has,” noting “I’m confident that this group of thoughtful, concerned staff can do just that within the regulatory world.” Pledges to the Board focused on building a collaborative working relationship, continuing to learn with Board members, and being accountable, answerable, and responsible for the mission, vision, and core values of this organization. “I plan to lead with you,” Hymans promised. “As Helen Keller said, ‘Alone we can do so little, together we can do so much.’ ” And there is much to do, in Hymans’s view.

Present

Challenges that Hymans sees in regulation include the current political climate around licensing and regulation. He noted a need for increasing efficiencies around the licensing process in response to what he anticipates will be “some fairly significant pressure” from legislators and professional organizations. He gave as an example the recent changes to law in Illinois that were enacted in an attempt to streamline the process by permitting students to take the Masters licensing exam without preapproval. Unfortunately, because ASWB was not consulted, the process as enacted falls outside ASWB exam policy, which requires that all exam candidates must be approved by the relevant state board before registering for an exam. ASWB is working with Illinois to resolve the issue. Hymans acknowledged the impetus to help students get licensed more quickly, saying: “We understand the rationale behind it, and it's those kinds of pressures that I think we're going to continue to face.” Another challenge: the question around use of the exam in the Canadian provinces and creating a French version of the exams. Hymans expressed that one of his goals is to support the Board to make some decision about this issue and move forward. In the past, ASWB was not yet ready to act, he noted. A decision, he said, will help ASWB determine how to continue to evolve as an international organization. The third challenge he mentioned involves staff moving into the new building and acclimating to all of the changes that will come as a result of that move, such as changes in workflow and changes in relationships. But, “in the long run,” he said, “we're going to have a great facility. Everybody's going to be happier and content, and I think will work better.” Hymans knows about working with ASWB staff. He has been with the organization for 13 years, hired as board services manager. He was promoted to director of board services and then to deputy executive director under former executive director Donna DeAngelis. For the last eight years, he has been part of the executive leadership team with CEO Mary Jo Monahan, as executive vice president for four years and as COO since 2016. During his tenure with ASWB, he said, “I've had the opportunity to really be a part of every single aspect of the programs here at ASWB.” His understanding of the exam program has been informed by serving as a subject matter expert supporting the practice analysis process and Examination Committee meetings. In the early years of his tenure at ASWB, he was one of only three social workers on staff—DeAngelis and Lavina Harless, now director of examination development, being the other two. “I really have learned to appreciate what goes into putting the exam program together,” he said. “The opportunities I've had to be a part of it have really created for me a solid understanding of the exam program, all aspects of it.” And he also knows what it’s like to take and pass the Clinical exam, an experience that gives him perspective on the process from the candidate’s point of view. In his role as director of board services, Hymans spent a lot of time traveling to visit with member boards—mostly in the early years to talk about the exam program but also to consult with boards about regulatory issues. He also had oversight of the ACE program and the Social Work Registry. Contract services such as application processing were in their infancy, he recalled; however, the Massachusetts contract was in place, serving as a model for other jurisdictions as time has passed.

Past

Prior to joining ASWB, Hymans led the master’s field program at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis School of Social Work. It was a large program, and he recalls filling between 500 and 550 placements each year. Before that, he was an assistant professor at Ball State University Department of Social Work in Indiana, where he taught in the areas of macro social work practice, social work policy, and field education. Hymans got started in teaching, he said, because of family circumstances. He was practicing in a private not-for-profit setting as a clinical social worker providing services to individuals, couples, and families after getting his MSW degree from the University of Iowa. When his first wife died of breast cancer, he was suddenly a single dad with a clinical practice that required a lot of evenings and weekends devoted to working with clients. A friend who was retiring from teaching at a school of social work in northwest Iowa encouraged him to apply for a teaching job at her school. Within a few months of Hymans being hired, the friend retired, the other faculty member left, and Hymans—the remaining faculty member of the program—became head of the department. From there, he applied for and accepted a teaching position at Ball State, in part because he felt the need to move away from the northwest Iowa culture. “It just fit,” he said of the opportunity at Ball State. “It fit me real well at the time. I enjoyed the classroom; I didn't necessarily enjoy all of the politics of a campus—it really has a lot of politics. But one of the things I liked about Ball State is that they continued to emphasize teaching over research, and that's really not the case in very many places.” He got to Virginia, he said, due to another set of family circumstances—a job opportunity for his wife, Karla. She had supported him in his job decisions, he said, and he wanted to support her opportunity. She had lived in Virginia before they got married, and he knew she didn’t really enjoy living in Indiana. Fortunately, he said, the day that Karla started her job at the hospital in Warrenton, Virginia, he saw the ad for board services manager with ASWB in Culpeper, a town about 30 miles away from her workplace. “I kind of took a risk coming out here, a professional risk,” he said, “but it has paid off very well for me to be a part of this organization.”

Future

As CEO, Hymans looks forward to continuing to focus on “really building the leadership knowledge, skills, and abilities of staff. We'll do the ‘KSAs of leadership,’ ” he said. “Mary Jo came in; she was so very gracious to partner with me. We've tried to build that so that it's not such a true reliance on her or me, and I think we need to keep that going.” In working with the Board of Directors as CEO, Hymans looks forward to building stronger relationships with Board members. There will be a shift as he moves from being employed as staff to being in a contractual relationship with the Board. However, he does not anticipate a dramatic shift in the work—in large part because of the leadership style Monahan embraces. “I've been a part of many of the hard conversations that the Board and Mary Jo have been a part of, and she's pulled me into those. So in some respects, it [my relationship with the Board] is not going to change dramatically; but it certainly is going to change contextually.” Hymans will become CEO on May 1, following Mary Jo Monahan’s retirement on April 30. Members will be able to welcome Dwight into his new role and bid farewell to Mary Jo at the 2020 education meeting in Chicago." ["post_title"]=> string(36) "New to the role, but not new to ASWB" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(35) "new-to-the-role-but-not-new-to-aswb" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-02-28 14:47:30" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-02-28 18:47:30" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(63) "https://www.aswb.org/?post_type=aswb_announcements&p=85993" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(18) "aswb_announcements" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } [2]=> object(WP_Post)#2175 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(86032) ["post_author"]=> string(4) "4024" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-02-28 12:19:59" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-02-28 16:19:59" ["post_content"]=> string(4394) "The North Dakota Board of Social Work Examiners is currently drafting administrative rules after the 2019 passage of a new law that improves the state’s mobility readiness. SB 2361 amends the state’s social work practice act to align with licensing standards in other states. It was signed by the governor on April 1, 2019. In presenting the bill to the North Dakota House of Representatives in March, Representative Dick Anderson cited several reasons for voting to pass the bill. They include workforce shortages of licensed social workers and the need to make it easier for social workers to gain licensure in North Dakota to “fill more jobs in rural communities that are currently in need of having a licensed social worker.” He also described how the bill’s language was developed. “It will align the North Dakota social work licensing laws with other states who are currently working on or have already passed legislation to align their laws with the Association of Social Work Boards model practice act,” he said. “This act reflects the best practices in social work regulations.”
Member Exchange
Among the changes the bill makes to North Dakota’s Century Code is the adoption of the license titles found in the ASWB Model Social Work Practice Act. According to the North Dakota Board of Examiners website, “The new … titles were enacted to better align with other states and help with practice mobility.” And while most of the other changes were designed to update and clean up existing language in areas such as impairment, ethics, and mandatory reporting, the board also added completely new language to address electronic practice. Now that the legislature has enacted SB 2361, it falls to members of the North Dakota Board of Social Work Examiners to write the administrative rules that will ensure the statute can be used. Board member Bianca Bell, LMSW, is leading that effort with board member Holly Hammarsten, LBSW, and public member Connor Griffin. They are working closely with Assistant Attorney General David Schaibley, who serves as legal counsel to the board. Appointed to the board in July, Bell has learned on the job since the committee first met in August. Rulemaking is “a very formal process,” she says. “We have had to do our homework to understand how the law’s provisions came about. Our rules have to maintain the legislative intent but be digestible and usable.” At the same time as the committee writes rules to implement the bill amending the social work practice act, it is writing rules for another new law, SB 2306, which provides for expedited professional licensing for military spouses. “Working with our legal counsel is helpful,” Bell says. “He designed a timeline for the rulemaking process to assist our members with understanding the process. The timeline also helps us stay on track, so we know what to achieve by those key dates.” Now that the administrative rules committee has drafted rules, they have presented the document to the board via a shared draft. “The board is reviewing and making recommendations,” Bell says. “Once the board is satisfied with the changes, it will present the rule changes to the public for comment.” “The rules will become official law once the legislative administrative rules committee approves them,” Schaibley says. He anticipates that process will be finished in the next eight months. Schaibley’s role goes beyond the nuts and bolts of rulemaking. He says that when boards are making changes to law, they should seek a wide range of input. “I would suggest that  boards … place an ever-increasing weight on identifying stakeholders of all types and reaching out to them through multiple means,” he says. “Every contact and exchange of ideas can end up increasing support for or improving the board’s ideas and if not reducing opposition—then at least making the board more aware of the opposing viewpoints so as to be better prepared going forward.” Bell encourages other boards to approach their rulemaking process by first identifying a timeline and developing an understanding of the process. “Identifying a timeline and a scope of what you are doing is key,” Bell says. “We are all volunteers with our own careers, so we need a good understanding of our scope.”  " ["post_title"]=> string(40) "What’s next after a new law is passed?" ["post_excerpt"]=> string(0) "" ["post_status"]=> string(7) "publish" ["comment_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["ping_status"]=> string(6) "closed" ["post_password"]=> string(0) "" ["post_name"]=> string(36) "whats-next-after-a-new-law-is-passed" ["to_ping"]=> string(0) "" ["pinged"]=> string(0) "" ["post_modified"]=> string(19) "2020-02-28 14:47:48" ["post_modified_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-02-28 18:47:48" ["post_content_filtered"]=> string(0) "" ["post_parent"]=> int(0) ["guid"]=> string(63) "https://www.aswb.org/?post_type=aswb_announcements&p=86032" ["menu_order"]=> int(0) ["post_type"]=> string(18) "aswb_announcements" ["post_mime_type"]=> string(0) "" ["comment_count"]=> string(1) "0" ["filter"]=> string(3) "raw" } } ["post_count"]=> int(3) ["current_post"]=> int(-1) ["in_the_loop"]=> bool(false) ["post"]=> object(WP_Post)#1825 (24) { ["ID"]=> int(85990) ["post_author"]=> string(4) "4024" ["post_date"]=> string(19) "2020-02-28 12:21:56" ["post_date_gmt"]=> string(19) "2020-02-28 16:21:56" ["post_content"]=> string(4633) "The year 2020 ushers in a new decade for all of us, and it is sure to bring changes. Will those changes be social, economic, and /or political? We will have to “stay tuned” to see what the future holds. However, one thing we know for certain is that 2020 will be a year of change and transition for ASWB. Several weeks ago, I shared with you that the ASWB Board of Directors had selected Dwight Hymans, ASWB’s current COO, as the next CEO of ASWB. Dwight will move into his new role on May 1, 2020, following the retirement of our current CEO, Mary Jo Monahan, on April 30.
President's Message
[caption id="attachment_81440" align="alignleft" width="200"] Harold Dean, ASWB president[/caption] During my career I have observed the process of leadership change in several different organizations. Some of these changes have been handled well; others have not. A change in leadership can be challenging for both an agency’s employees as well as its clients. This is especially true if the new leader does not have a full understanding of the day-to-day operations and how departments work together to achieve the overall mission. In these types of situations, employees often become dissatisfied in their work, and as a result client or member services can suffer. These are just a few of the reasons the selection process for leadership of any organization must be thoughtful, deliberate, and strategic. This was certainly the case when the ASWB Board of Directors made the thoughtful, deliberate, and strategic decision to select Dwight as our organization’s next CEO. As Dwight moves into the role of CEO, he brings with him an extensive knowledge of the ASWB organization. Dwight has been a valuable employee of ASWB for the last 13 years. He formerly served as manager and then director of board services, where he gained an understanding of regulatory issues as well as the similarities and differences of our member boards. For the last four years, he has served in the role of COO, gaining firsthand knowledge of the day-to-day business operations of the ASWB organization. During his time at ASWB, he has routinely represented the association in meetings throughout the United States and Canada, all the while establishing excellent working relationships with other stakeholder organizations. Dwight has also been involved with our current strategic framework at every phase of the process from proposal by the Board, to adoption by the delegate assembly, to our current implementation efforts. And of course, anyone who has attended delegate assembly in the last few years knows that Dwight has been at the helm of the construction of our new ASWB headquarters. Because of his dedicated service in various leadership roles, Dwight has gained the trust and respect of our member boards. Given all these factors, the Board of Directors is confident that Dwight’s professionalism, prior experience, institutional knowledge of ASWB, and understanding of the broader issues of possible impact to the organization will ensure that our organization remains relevant, financially stable, and committed to excellence. With a background in health care, I usually associate the number 2020 with the measurement of a person’s visual acuity. During the year 2020, it is important that ASWB use one of the skills of visual acuity—focus. 2020 will bring with it not only a transition in ASWB’s CEO leadership but also the transition of moving to our new headquarters where all of ASWB’s operations will finally be under one roof. This will be an exciting time for our staff, Board of Directors, and member boards. Throughout these changes, our organization must remain true to its mission “to provide support and services to the social work regulatory community to advance safe, competent, and ethical practices to strengthen public protection.” ASWB is a wonderful organization, not only because of its highly skilled staff, but also because of the many wonderful, committed volunteers who support the work of the association. As we continue to move forward in 2020, it is my sincere hope that in whatever capacity you may serve our organization, you will join me in using 20/20 vision to keep a sharp and clear focus on ASWB’s commitment to public protection." 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